At its peak, Insert Credit was an iconoclastic blend of esoterica, literary analysis, and cult of personality

So okay. Today ends the penultimate season of Riven: The Series Lost. Tomorrow ends the penultimate season of Supernatural. After today, only two more episodes in the second season of Lupo & Cutter. (Yeah, season 18 was practically a reboot. It’s good now. Also, Season 20 is Dick Wolf’s “goal” for the show — anything after that is bonus. So, in that sense sort of penultimate here as well.)

A bit of a relief, I can tell you. Somehow, however much I like a thing, I welcome the opportunity to divest myself of the self-imposed responsibility of keeping in sync with it. Nothing more to pay attention to! I can focus those brain cycles elsewhere.

Good year for Upper Boat to cut back, while we’re at it.

Author: Azure

It's me!

7 thoughts on “At its peak, Insert Credit was an iconoclastic blend of esoterica, literary analysis, and cult of personality”

  1. I’m not sure what to make of the post’s title, but I agree that as much as I love Lost (among other shows) I welcome the opportunity to step back and change my habits and use of time.

  2. I actually just read an interview that said Myst was one of the big influences on the writers, and the show’s approach to storytelling was on some level influenced by the way the player tackles problems in that series.

    Which explains why it has felt that way ever since (at least) season two.

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